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Phillies trade rumors: Nick Markakis?

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Would the Phillies trade for Atlanta's expensive and power-less veteran?

MLB: Atlanta Braves at Kansas City Royals Peter G. Aiken-USA TODAY Sports

Everyone knows the Phillies need help in the outfield, and there aren't any angels, whether they be Angels of the Los Angeles variety or the kind you'd find in a kids film, that are arriving with any haste.

Yes, Cody Asche is working his way back from a strained oblique, and he could be back with the team in the next week or so. Aaron Altherr got some good news from his doctor as he works his way back from a broken wrist, but it's probably unwise to expect anything from him anytime soon.

And while Tyler Goeddel's play has progressed nicely, he is certainly going to hit some rough patches as a young player who has never been above Double-A before this year. Peter Bourjos and his limp bat is still making regular appearances because of his defense, and David Lough is still gainfully employed by the team as well.

Certainly, offensive production in the outfield is a problem. So perhaps it isn't totally surprising that it was reported by Nick Cafardo in The Boston Globe that the Phillies (and Royals) are taking a look at Atlanta Braves right fielder Nick Markakis as a potential trade option from outside the organization.

Coming into Monday's action, Phillies right fielders have a wOBA of .249, a wRC+ of 49 and an OPS of .562, all last in MLB. They are slashing a combined .210/.267/.295. Phils left fielders have been worse, even with improved play by Goeddel. They have a wOBA of .235, a wRC+ of 41 and an OPS of .529, also all worst in MLB.

Offense is a big problem, especially in the corner outfield. But this is not new information. It is a continuation of something that has been anticipated since spring training.

Based on some of his numbers, adding Markakis would improve things. In 42 games (189 PAs), he's hitting .245 with a very good on-base percentage of .354, walking in 13.8% of his plate appearances.

However, he would not solve the Phils' blatant power problem. He has just one dinger on the year with 24 RBIs, a .340 slugging percentage and an isolated power of .094. That's coming off a season last year in which he tallied 3 homers in 686 plate appearances.

A bopper he is not.

In addition, defensive metrics rate him as below average, and there is also the not-insignificant issue of his contract, which was a head-scratcher when it was signed before last season.

Markakis is due $10.5 million this season, next season and in 2018, when he will be 34. There is simply no way the Phils are going to put a contract like that on the books, especially since it doesn't help them in their area of greatest need - power.

If the Phillies keep winning, you're going to see them linked with other potentially available outfielders as the trade deadline nears. But whoever they get, it either has to be a young player with upside, power potential and years of team control or a veteran on an expiring contract.

Nick Markakis is none of those things. And that's why signing him would make no sense.