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2016 MLB Draft Fifth Round: Phillies Select Cole Irvin 137th Overall

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The University of Oregon left-hander had Tommy John Surgery in 2014, worked his way back in 2015, and turned things on towards the end of this season.

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The Phillies have selected University of Oregon lefty Cole Irvin with the 137th selection in the 2016 MLB Draft.

He was ranked #195 in the BA Top 500, and #138 by MLB.com.

Irvin was drafted in 2015 by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 32nd round (976th overall) but couldn't reach an agreement, staying in school with the Ducks for his senior season. He was also drafted out of Servite High School in 2012 by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 29th round.

Irvin certainly comes with a little bit of baggage, as he had Tommy John Surgery in 2014. He worked his way back in 2015, and turned things on towards the end of this season, according to MLB.com:

After missing the 2014 season at Oregon following Tommy John surgery, Irvin returned in 2015 and worked to shake off the rust. He struggled at the outset of the 2016 season, but it appears a switch went off late in the spring as he took over the Ducks' role as Friday night starter and looked more like the prospect he was coming out of high school.

The twice-drafted Irvin is the epitome of the advanced college lefty when he his firing on all cylinders. For much of the time since he returned from surgery, Irvin had been throwing his fastball in the 86-88 mph range, but was up to 93-94 mph consistently late in his redshirt junior season thanks to some added strength. His slider and changeup will flash above-average at times and he does a good job of throwing everything with the same arm speed to add deception. A good athlete with a solid pickoff move, he throws a lot of strikes, though he can be susceptible to the home run ball.

Irvin's ceiling is limited to that of a back-end starter, but he is really polished and if he is the guy he was late in the spring, he's a high probability big leaguer.